Sun | Oct 2, 2022

Maitland’s attorney finds ‘bloodstain’ evidence interesting

Published:Saturday | August 13, 2022 | 12:10 AM
Donna-Lee Donaldson.
Donna-Lee Donaldson.

Christopher Townsend, the attorney representing Constable Noel Maitland, is questioning the veracity of evidence in the form of bloodstains believed to be Donna-Lee Donaldson’s which were reportedly found in his client’s apartment. Maitland has...

Christopher Townsend, the attorney representing Constable Noel Maitland, is questioning the veracity of evidence in the form of bloodstains believed to be Donna-Lee Donaldson's which were reportedly found in his client's apartment.

Maitland has been charged with the murder of the vanished social media personality, who was reportedly last seen on July 11 and reported missing two days later.

Investigators believe Donaldson was killed on July 12 between 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. Her body has not been located.

After exiting the Kingston and St Andrew Parish Court, where Maitland made his first appearance yesterday, Townsend questioned why it took more than three forensic checks at the accused man's home to unearth the findings.

“How did the blood miss them in number one visit? How did it miss them in number two visit? How did it miss them in number three visit? So that will be explored ... and, of course, they will attempt to provide the answers,” Townsend said, of his line of argument to be raised with the prosecution.

Townsend said the only report that is ready concerns the bloodstains investigators say they found at Maitland's Chelsea Avenue apartment.

“What I found interesting was that it took some four or five forensic teams on different occasions to locate this blood,” Townsend said.

Maitland remanded

Maitland was yesterday remanded until August 22 by Senior Parish Judge Lori-Ann Cole Montague.

The embattled police constable, who is accused of murdering his girlfriend, entered the courtroom at 10:38 a.m. on Friday, dressed in a blue demin suit.

He was placed briefly in the courtroom holding area and could be seen looking out from behind the metal bars from time to time.

Soon afterwards, he entered the prisoners' dock, glancing from side to side with a concerned look on his face.

When the matter was called up, prosecutors informed the court that some reports and further statements in the matter were outstanding.

The prosecution, however, served the defence and the court with a preliminary report in the matter.

Townsend argued that based on the preliminary report, his client is a candidate for bail at the earliest convenient date.

“I have read the preliminary report and I do believe that under these circumstances, ma'am, that bail application really ought to be heard,” he told the court.

Judge Cole Montague said the preliminary report was voluminous and noted that August was a peculiar month because there are administrative functions that must be attended to.

“This court has no objection in hearing the application,” she said, however.

A fingerprint order was also made.

editorial@gleanerjm.com